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seafood risotto

13 Aug

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/risotto/seafood-risotto-risotto-ai-frutti-di-mar

ingredients

• 1.5 litres water
• 2 small carrots, roughly chopped
• 3 tomatoes, squashed
• 1 bay leaf
• a small bunch of fresh parsley, one sprig left whole, remaining leaves picked and finely chopped
• 1.5kg mixed seafood (see above), scaled, cleaned, gutted, with heads and gills removed, mussels debearded
• 1 x basic risotto recipe
• ½ a bulb of fennel, finely chopped, herby tops reserved
• 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
• a pinch of crumbled dried chilli
• a pinch of saffron strands
• extra virgin olive oil
• juice of 1 lemon

method

This risotto is something very special. You will need a mixture of seafood – try red mullet, monkfish, bream, John Dory, cod, mussels, clams, prawns and a little sliced squid. You can either use bought fish stock to make this risotto or you can have a go at making your own, as I do here. (Ask your fishmonger for the fish heads to use in the stock – these usually go into the bin, so you shouldn’t be charged for them). I’m going to make it in a slightly different way to the normal method, where I would fillet the fish before adding the bones and fish-heads to the stock, so bear with me!

Put the exact amount of water into a large pan with the carrots, tomatoes, bay leaf and whole parsley sprig and bring to the boil, adding your whole fish but not your shellfish. Simmer for 10 minutes, then remove each fish from the pan and flake the flesh away from the bones. (If you have a cod head, try to remove the cheeks as they’re the best bit!) Put the meat on a plate to one side; return any bones to the stock to simmer for another 15 minutes max, skimming any froth off the surface every so often. Meanwhile start your basic risotto, adding the fennel, fennel seeds, chilli and saffron to the pan at Stage 1.

Pass the stock through a colander into another pan and throw away the vegetables and bones. Add most of the fish stock to your risotto, keeping a little to finish the dish, and when the rice is nearly cooked towards the end of Stage 3, add your flaked fish and shellfish. After 3 or 4 minutes the shellfish will have opened (discard any that remain closed); then remove from the heat.

As you’re not supposed to mix cheese and fish in pasta or risotto dishes we’re not going to finish it with Parmesan. Instead, at Stage 4, when you add the butter, check the seasoning, drizzle with a lug of extra virgin olive oil and squeeze over the lemon juice. To serve, divide the risotto between your plates, and spoon over the remaining stock. Drizzle with some more extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle with the remaining parsley and the reserved fennel tops.

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basic risotto

13 Aug

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/risotto/basic-risotto-recipe/

ingredients

• 115g/4oz couscous
• 1 x 200g/7oz salmon fillet, skin on, scaled and pinboned
• extra virgin olive oil
• sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 1 small courgette, sliced into batons
• 1 small handful of asparagus tips
• 1 red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
• 2 ripe tomatoes, roughly chopped
• juice of ½ a lemon
a small handful of fresh coriander, roughly chopped
• 1 tablespoon crème fraîche
method

This is a great recipe for making risotto. You want it to be smooth, creamy and oozy, not thick and stodgy.

stage 1

Heat the stock. In a separate pan, heat the olive oil and butter, add the onions, garlic and celery, and fry very slowly for about 15 minutes without colouring. When the vegetables have softened, add the rice and turn up the heat.

stage 2

The rice will now begin to lightly fry, so keep stirring it. After a minute it will look slightly translucent. Add the vermouth or wine and keep stirring — it will smell fantastic. Any harsh alcohol flavours will evaporate and leave the rice with a tasty essence.

stage 3

Once the vermouth or wine has cooked into the rice, add your first ladle of hot stock and a good pinch of salt. Turn down the heat to a simmer so the rice doesn’t cook too quickly on the outside. Keep adding ladlefuls of stock, stirring and almost massaging the creamy starch out of the rice, allowing each ladleful to be absorbed before adding the next. This will take around 15 minutes. Taste the rice — is it cooked? Carry on adding stock until the rice is soft but with a slight bite. Don’t forget to check the seasoning carefully. If you run out of stock before the rice is cooked, add some boiling water.

stage 4

Remove from the heat and add the butter and Parmesan. Stir well. Place a lid on the pan and allow to sit for 2 minutes. This is the most important part of making the perfect risotto, as this is when it becomes outrageously creamy and oozy like it should be. Eat it as soon as possible, while the risotto retains its beautiful texture.